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It’s now illegal in Portugal for your boss to text you after work!

COVID-19, according to Ana Mendes Godinho, Portugal's Minister of Labour and Social Security, "has expedited the necessity to regulate what needs to be regulated." For individuals who work from home, the new legislation will undoubtedly be a pleasant shift.

Are you fed up with your employer texting or contacting you for work after hours? You might want to consider moving to Portugal. The Portuguese parliament has enacted new labor regulations aimed at attracting “digital nomads” to the nation while simultaneously providing a healthy work-life balance for workers.

Employers who contact their employees after work hours face fines under the new legislation. They’ve arrived at a time when numerous homes have transformed into workplaces. As a result of the new culture of working from home that has emerged as a result of the coronavirus outbreak.
However, many individuals grumble about working from home since they have less privacy and are subject to more interruptions.

According to Vice, the Portugal parliament adopted new regulations for the benefit of employees on Friday. In addition to the fines, businesses have to reimburse their employees. For higher expenditures spent when working from homes, such as gas, internet, and power bills.

It's now illegal in Portugal for your boss to text you after work!

The government of Portugal Socialist Party enacted various legislations to assist workers in adapting to the new work-from-home culture. However, not all of them were approved by the legislature. Workers’ “right to disconnect,” which allows them to turn off work gadgets, did not receive enough support.

The parliament also passed laws prohibiting businesses from monitoring employees’ productivity at home. Also, requiring face-to-face meetings with coworkers at least once every two months. Employees with children will be able to work from home until their children become eight years old without obtaining management consent, according to the Independent.

COVID-19, according to Ana Mendes Godinho, Portugal’s Minister of Labour and Social Security. For individuals who work from home, the new legislation will undoubtedly be a pleasant shift.